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Chambers Rosewood Grand Muscat 375ml
You can travel down Barkly Street Rutherglen and not even notice the tiny little winery housed in a collection of corrugated iron sheds
$6399each
$767DOZEN
Yet Chambers Rosewood Are Internationally Renowned Afficianados of Australian fortifieds could easily be forgiven for not realising that some of the world's finest Muscat are produced here This small, family operation was established by William Chambers in 1858 and has operated as a winery continuously ever since, long enough for the sixth generation of Chambers to make wine.
 
Farnese Fantini Trebbiano
$1699each
$201DOZEN
 
Carpene Superiore di Cartizze DOCG
Just below the Alpine Dolomites of Veneto
$5099each
$611DOZEN
The Family Growers Of Treviso Have Been Prosecco Making For Generations The breathtaking vistas at Valdobbiadene are at the very heart of Prosecco DOCG the most auspicious parcels of vine are planted to an elite slope, designated Superiore di Cartizze.
$2399each
$287DOZEN
Willows G7 Grenache Shiraz G7 FOR SEVEN GENERATIONS OF BAROSSA VITICULTURE BY THE SCHOLZ FAMILY. Establishing a mixed farm of livestock and orchards in 1845, Johann Scholz planted one of the first Barossa vineyards along the alluvial banks of Para River. An ideal site, invigorated by gully winds for a slow ripening of intense berry spice flavours in the grapes. Mostly Grenache with a fifth of Shiraz, defined by its succulence and aromatic allure, the softly textured tannins, decadent spice and wickedly wild cherry fruits of Grenache, the firm structure and palate length of Shiraz.
$3099each
$371DOZEN
Leconfield Coonawarra Cabernet LECONFIELD'S REGIONAL FLAGSHIP HAS REMAINED IN SPLENDID FORM FOR DECADES, a stellar performer which achieved immediate prominence and massive critical acclaim from inaugural release. An exacting approach to viticulture is central to the magnificent quality of fruit, uncompromising standards of vinification complete an extraordinary Coonawarra Cabernet. A headily perfumed wine of ripe cassis aromas, framed by luxuriously fragrant oak and underpinned by solid structure, a soup├žon of Cabernet Franc contributes edifying floral complexity.
$3699each
$443DOZEN
Turkey Flat Cabernet Sauvignon 2012 VINIFIED FROM FRUIT GROWN TO THE HISTORIC, hundred and fifty year old Black Flat Block, an intensely varietal Cabernet Sauvignon, infused with the edifying eucalypt characters from thickets of old gums that grow along the creek bed. Planted to a cool, shaded shallow gully, the mixed alluvials and dark, fertile Biscay clays of Black Flat Block, yield a quality of Cabernet that's as eloquent as it is unique. Highly articulate with the characterful herbaceousness of an exquisite site, Turkey Flat offers the complexity and grace to match with caramelized foie gras or the finest wagyu.
At latitude 45
degrees south, New ZealandÔÇÖs Central Otago is the southern most wine region in the world
Alpine mountains to the west, rocky ranges to the south and dry tussock covered hills to the east dominate the landscape, and all assist in the topographical elements of this most exceptional of terroirs. In between all of this grandness, on the lush valley floors are nestled the Nanny Goat Vineyards.
 Nanny Goat

This is a region of climatic extremes, with typically very hot summers, short autumns and bitterly cold days in winter. The soils are rocky with poor fertility. All of these conditions are perfect for producing world-class Pinot Noir. The unique terroir of Central Otago produces wines with incredible intensity and distinction. Nanny Goat Vineyard focuses solely on Pinot Noir.

Nanny Goat Vineyard Pinot Noir is all about finesse and layers of complexity. The fruit is the focus and it is encouraged to express itself. Nanny Goat concentrates on making wines that show varietal and regional cherry fruits, with oak balance and tannin structure.

Michelini's is a
well-established award winning, family owned wine company located at the heart of the Alpines region in Victoria
In 1851 the Michelini's began growing grapes and making wine in the Trentino Alto Adige region of the Italian Alps. Emo Michelini arrived in Sydney in 1949 at the age of 25, and two years later with his wife Olga moved to the Buckland Valley where he began share-farming with several other Italian families, growing and curing tobacco. Looking for a source of fruit from cooler climates as blending material for their existing warmer sites, the Barossa based Orlando Wines approached Emo in the early 1980's and discussed the possibility of developing a vineyard in the region.
 Michelini

During the spring of 1982 Michelini's Vineyard was established by Emo Michelini and his sons Ilario and Dino. Perched in the Buckland Valley between the snow capped peaks of Mt Buffalo and the pristine crystal clear waters of Devil's Creek, the Alpine winters and cool summers nights characteristic of this secluded valley provide ideal conditions for maturing premium grapes. Emo acquired some the first varietal cuttings of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from Orlando Wines, South Australia. With the majority of the vineyard obtaining river frontage and with the lime added to the soil to sweeten it, the fresh mountain air and the Alpine climate provided the ideal conditions to produce classic premium, cool climate wine. Merlot and Marzemino were planted along with further Chardonnay in 1991

Varieties planted are Chardonnay (16 Hectares), Pinot Noir (10 Hectares) and Merlot (10 Hectares). As well as the more mainstream varieties, Michelini have adapted traditional wine making techniques to produce the traditional Italian Pinot Grigio, Barbera, Sangiovese, Teroldego, Marzemino and Fragolino, as well as the sparkling white and red Fizz. Elevation is around 250 metres, with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir harvested for sparkling wines from late February to late March. Chardonnay ripens for table wine around late March, and Merlot early to mid April.

The vineyard is set to the Scott Henry trellis system, with 8 canes per vine on the more vigorous Chardonnay and Pinot Noir blocks and 4 canes per vine on the Merlot block. Moveable foliage wires contain shoots from the top cordon in an upright position whilst shoots from the bottom cordon are mostly allowed to fall down under their own weight. Leaf removal in the fruiting zone is carried out on Merlot to improve sunlight interception and on Chardonnay for sparkling wine to spread ripeness dates. Yield is regulated on the Merlot by removal of secondary shoots prior to flowering, and removal of excessive bunches per shoot at veraison. Target yield is around 12.5 tonnes per hectare.

While the industry has long recognised the region's suitability for producing premium fruit for sparkling wine, growing grapes in this district is not without its challenges and difficulties. Over time the vineyard has been developed to incorporate state-of-the-art equipment including Pellenc machine harvester and high technology spraying equipment which used in conjunction with the high skill level of the Michelini brothers and initiatives such as Integrated Pest Management (IPM) systems has resulted in strong risk management strategies.

Dino Michelini has a firm commitment that wine quality starts in the vineyard. The regional character is drawn from the Alpine Valley climate of cold winters and an extended summer of hot days and cool nights. He says that the main threat to vintage success is spring frosts, affecting the vineyard site in the Buckland River Valley. Frost protection is provided from two pumping stations on the bank of the Buckland River, supplying water to sprinklers across the entire vineyard. Through innovation in grape growing and wine making, the aim is to exceed the quality expectations in every bottle of Michelini's Wines.

Frogmore Creek Wines
is one of Tasmania's most awarded wineries. Proudly family owned, Frogmore Creek sources grapes from the finest cool climate regions in Tasmania
The Frogmore Creek vineyards were founded around the principles of sustainable farming practises. The site was chosen due to it's suitability to growing great Pinot Noir, Riesling and Chardonnay. The vineyard is located at Penna which is 30 minutes drive from the city of Hobart. Critical climate indicators such as rainfall, temperature, sunshine hours and number of rain days combine in perfect balance to create an ideal natural environment for growing premium quality grapes. The property is 316 acres with 81 acres suitable for vines. The remaining land accommodates grazing, animals, dams and a large portion (almost 80 acres) is set aside for conservation projects. The current varietals include Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Grigio.
 Frogmore Creek

Frogmore Creek aims to maintain and nurture a biologically diverse environment for the health of the vines and resident fauna. By utilising sustainable farming methods the waterways will remain a safe place for frogs, fish and birds. Since the first vines were planted and the dams established, four species of frogs have made the Frogmore Creek Vineyard their home. Frogmore Creek Vineyard was developed on an organic philosophy, incorporating compost and cover cropping for soil health and vine fertility, organic fungicides for vine health and protection against unwanted disease, and organic integrated pest management to combat pests. The skins, seeds and pressings from the grapes are composted over 6-8 months, after which time the matured compost can be used in the vineyard.

Frogmore Creek have a holistic outlook on farming and strongly believe if you have and build healthy soil, then healthy plants will result. It follows that healthy plants are much less susceptible to diseases and pests. The philosophy is to find a way to control problems without introducing chemicals. The use of animals within vineyards is one of the techniques used in sustainable farming.

Frogmore Creek uses Guinea Fowl in the vineyard to naturally control wingless grasshoppers and weevils. Both of these pests cause havoc as they eat the shoots and leaves of the vines. The Guinea Fowl eliminate the need for insecticides by feeding on these unwanted insects. The birds are successful as they have few predators in Tasmania, and at night they sleep safely up high in the trees.

Native wasps are an integral part of the estate's Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM) control programme. There are a number of native wasp species indigenous to Tasmania, each of which attack LBAM at a different stage in its life cycle. Cover crops are grown in between the vines to assist in the improvement of soil fertility, soil structure and as a shelter and food source for beneficial insects. Frogmore Creek employs crimson clover, oats, strawberry clover and red clover, to name a few.

The estate's Campania Vineyard is well known for being the location of one of the first sightings of the thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger. The Campania property consists of 1008 acres of which 111 acres are under vine. The vines are planted on various parts of the property, selected for the suitability to each variety. Campania Vineyard consists of 27 different blocks, situated on very different altitudes. The lowest block is planted approximately 80 metres above sea level and one of the Pinot Noir blocks is planted at approximately 180 metres above sea level. Each vineyard block contains differing soil structures giving unique characteristics to each varietal. All blocks were planted with northerly aspects, allowing the vines to receive the most sunlight possible.

The Wirra Wirra
Cellars were built by Robert Strangways Wigley, one of the McLaren Vale's all time characters
Wigley began building at the turn of the century using Dr. A.C. Kelly's plans of a split-level design that his friend Alec Johnston had used to build the Pirramimma winery. Wirra Wirra is an aboriginal name meaning amongst the gums. Born in 1864, Bob Wigley studied Law and Architecture and managed to play cricket for South Australia. His wild pranks as a young man had already made him somewhat of an embarrassment to his family. In 1893 he was prudently sent to rusticate in McLaren Vale. He planted the vineyard in 1894 and made his first wine with Alec Johnston in 1897. By 1901 he was the owner of one of the best wineries and vineyards in the district with 100 acres under vines and 15 acres under currants.
 Wirra Wirra

Stylistically, Wirra Wirra established a long and distinguished history for itself of producing wines with great elegance, balance and complexity. "Mr. Thomas Hardy says of all those he ever had under him, no town man worked harder than Mr. Bob Wigley who was at Bankside for 18 months learning winemaking. At the end of this time he took up 240 acres of land at McLaren Vale, and has succeeded in producing wonderfully fine full-bodied Burgundy, especially suited for the export trade." - The Register Adelaide Australia 1903

Bob Wigley died in 1924 having contributed much to the life of the district and having made many fine wines which in the main found their way to England, having been shipped by Burgoynes of London. After 1936 the original 240 acres were sold by his family and eventually the cellars with only 7 acres left fell into disuse. It was not until late 1969 that the winery, by then virtually a derelict building, and the surrounding 7 acres of land was re-established.

Cousins Greg and Roger Trott purchased the holding from Vern Sparrow, son of Wigley's foreman Jack Sparrow. Roger Trott, an accountant, has a property at McLaren Flat, Moray Park, and Greg's vineyard. Bethany, is just across the road from Wirra Wirra, while Scrubby Rise, part of the original Wirra Wirra, is immediately in front of the cellars. Before they bought the old, ruined winery, Greg spent five years with Southern Vales Co-operative looking after growers interests and in his own words, had become familiar with the rudiments of winemaking.

Like many of the McLaren Vale winemakers, these men were helped by their friendly rivals, a feature of the district. Good use was made of Oenological Services of McLaren Vale, a winemaking advisory and laboratory service led by Peter Klose and started by David Hardy, Alex Johnston and Colin Kay. In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins.

In a gesture worthy of the wonderful Wigley, the two cousins Trott spent a frantic five weeks gathering equipment from all over the state. Then, armed with an ancient wooden Bagshaw crusher, a pump and an old French press, they made their first wine in the open air amidst the ruins. In its modern day, Wirra Wirra has hosted a vast and eclectic array of winemakers, cellar hands, drifters and vagrants each vintage. One of the most interesting things about February, is the influx of a range of recalcitrants from all over the world. Yanks, Poms, Krauts, Frogs, Kiwis, Queenslanders, the occasional Aussie and more, all converge on the cellars to pick, pump, drain, crush, press, and massage the fruit that comes in from the vineyards. There is now nothing quirky about the design of the winery, which is in its third stage of development. Although functional and technologically advanced, the cellars retain a soul. This is largely due to the spirit of the tribe that work there.

WARNING Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 years. The penalty exceeds $6,000
It is an offence for a person under the age of 18 years to purchase or receive liquor. The penalty exceeds $500. Liquor Licence 51409215

ANZ Wines has no affiliation with Australia New Zealand Bank. ANZ Wines is a customer of ANZ Bank, the involvement is limited to provision of banking services